Tour info

Duration
5-6 hours city tour/ by car and walking
Distance
Walking: ~ 3 km (1.9 mi)
Pick up/drop off
Wherever you choose

Major Sights

  • St.Sava Temple
  • National Assembly of Serbia
  • City Hall (the Old Castle)
  • Republic Square
  • National Theatre
  • Knez Mihalova Street (pedestrian zone)
  • Kalemegdan Park and Fortress
  • Confluence of Sava and Danube
  • St. Michael’s Cathedral
  • Museum of Yugoslav History and Tito’s Mausoleum
  • New Belgrade Area
  • Zemun Old City Core and Gardos Tower

Recommended Gear

  • Camera
  • Hat
  • Sunglasses
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Detailed information

D(r)ive in(to) Belgrade, a place where Central and Southern Europe collide on the stage of turbulent events, a crossroad which holds secrets of centuries-old enemies, the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires. Once witnesses to dramatic and brutal happenings, Kalemegdan fortress and Gardos tower are nowadays perceived as Belgrade’s most romantic spots. Heart of contemporary Belgrade is around them. Get lost in the bohemian maze of the modern-day Zemun.  Let the vastness of Saint Sava temple – the testament of Serb spirituality and piousness – hold your gaze. Learn how Serbian modern heroes reclaimed their country’s independence and how Duke Mihajlo Obrenovic, after whom the main pedestrian zone is named, laid the foundations of the modern Serbian civil society. Hear the locals each tell you their own view of the making and unmaking of Yugoslavia. Explore the exciting ethnological heritage of the region and see for yourself why Serbian cuisine is held in such a high regard.

” The sky over Belgrade is large and high; during bright winters with their icy splendour, as well as summer storms when the entire sky turns into a single dark cloud, which, driven by raging winds, carries the rain mixed with dust from the Panonian plain; and in spring, when it appears to bloom along with the earth; and in autumn, when it gets heavy with autumn stars that come in swarms – it is always beautiful and abundant, as a sort of compensation to this town for everything that is missing in it and a consolation for everything that it should not be. ” Ivo Andric, Serbian writer and Nobel Prize winner for Literature